When I was younger my mum and dad used to leave stale bread out in the garden for the birds. I would sit on the step of the back door and watch the sparrows and blackbirds with fascination – sharp beaks and shiny feathers rooting around in the grass for a feast. When my mum got cats we didn’t leave out anymore bread, and we didn’t see anymore birds.

A garden has always been an important specification for me when looking at potential homes to rent. When we moved to East London the flat we rented had the smallest of concrete patches with a tiny unusable shed and a huge towering tree that blocked out all of the sunlight – but it was a garden. A garden in London no less. So we rented that flat and I set out to entice the birds in.

I bought a feeder, and a bird box and I left out a tiny china plate with mealworms on – all to bring the birds in. They never came despite my attention and best efforts. Ironically I never saw a single bird in our garden – not until a week before we left when I saw a lone blue tit singing high up in that wretched tree.

Moving to Essex a garden was still a must. We got one, albeit a very small one. And once again, the birds were on my mind. This time I was determined to bring them in… and I was successful!

After a great deal of  research I learned some important things that I’d like to share with anyone who is looking to bring some feathered friends in to the garden.

  1. Different birds like different foods. Buying one type of seed and hanging it in a feeder will not attract different kinds of birds – it might not even attract one kind. It’s important to buy different feeders and supply different feeds. I now have seeds, sunflower hearts, fatballs and peanut granules. The blue tits and great tits love the peanut granules and a rather fat robin seems to have made his way through four fatballs with minimal help from the blackbirds. We got our feeder from B&M for a bargainous £8! B&M is also really great for bird food and does some great deals on feeder/seed combos. Wilkos is another shop I’d recommend if you want to cut down the cost of feeding wild birds.
  2. Water is key. Right now I have a little dish that I fill with water – it sits on the bird feeder and is there to provide fresh drinking water or a little bath to birds who may require it. Eventually I’m hoping to get a birdbath as I have read that they help the process along even more so.
  3. Shrubs / greenery is a must. My garden overlooks another which is a little awkward. But the garden it overlooks is filled with bushes and trees and things that can provide cover for birds who need to dart. During the summer I will be looking to plant some bushes of my own. I am hoping to attract goldfinches – I have read they are fans of teasel.

Baring these things in mind we have been able to attract a few different types of birds to the garden – even some I can’t identify! Below are some photographs I have taken of just some of the sweet birds that frequent our garden. Please note, these photographs were taken through a glass door and as such are not in pin sharp focus!

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We purchased this feeder station from B&M. The coconut fat ball and feeders/seed came separately but were reasonably priced.

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